The Expected is Still Unexpected

On July 28th, at 1:00 am in the morning my phone rang, it was the hospice nurse informing me that Mom had died at 12:28 a

Mom and her skydiving team – Frances, Jeff and Elizabeth

And yes, our hospice nurse had prepared us for this  . . . he said as nicely as he could that she was “leaving”, that “it was time”  . . . using gentle words to describe death.  Still, when the call came early Friday morning I wasn’t’t “prepared.”  Why?  Because no one ever is.

As you know if you’ve been reading my columns, the family had done all we could to prepare for death.  So the lesson learned was PREPLAN.  My brother and I had  hired a funeral home which allowed us to make our father the focus of our lives in the the immediate days after his partner of 63 years died. He insisted on seeing her one last time, my brother called the funeral home and they prepared her for Dad’s visit.  My father insisted on a small, familial memorial service — not a problem, we focused on the service and the reception after.  Caterers were hired, programs were printed and music abounded.

And yes, all this costs money but there was no “guilt money”.  We knew what we could spend and had done all the budgeting when hiring our funeral home.  In fact, we told the director that when Dad dies he wants his ashes placed in a military cemetery in Ft. Worth, TX – next to one of his best friends, our cousin General Akin,  “so they can pal around.”  The funeral home takes care of that, as well.

So, yes it all worked to our benefit.  Mom was cremated, some of her ashes placed in the ground at the nearby churchyard and the rest to be mixed with Dad’s when we take them to their final resting place.  What doesn’t go away, nor should it, is the grief.  it comes in waves.  At the service when I spoke I didn’t shed a tear.  Two days later, telling a ‘stranger’ the story, my eyes welled with tears.

Grief counselors tell you this is what happens.  I was shocked at myself, I knew Mom was close to death but when the finality happens it hits hard!  We even had time for last rites, last songs, last moments  . . . but death is final and no amount of preparation prepares you for it.

Revel in the memories, think of the good times and admire your loved ones for all they accomplished  . . . including you!  Yes, they do live on in our hearts.

Nursing Homes – Often the End Game

I am confident most of you heard the news about the eight seniors who died from overheating.  They were all in a licensed “nursing home” in Hollywood Hills.   ‘Nursing Home’ is a euphemism for a home for seniors who are at the poverty level and qualify for medicaid.

Nursing homes are like every other industry — they have to make money to survive.  In the case of nursing homes they’re paid by the state medicaid fund and it’s per pa

The nursing home visit

tient.  This fund is made up of state and federal dollars.  Obama Care expanded medicaid in the states who took the federal dollars but Florida is not one of them.

Bottom line, these are not the luxurious environments for either staff or residents.  In my parents case, Mom had been in a lovely residential facility where she was one of three or four people.  Her Long Term Care Insurance paid for it.  She outlived her two year policy and we had to place her in a Nursing Home.  It was our only realistic option as Mom’s care in an Alzheimer’s facility would be close to $7000,00 a month.  Mom and Dad couldn’t afford it and neither could the children.

In pursuit of the best we could find, I  went to several nursing homes and learned more than I needed to know.  All these homes are very austere and it’s a shock!  Bare floors, usually

formica, and waiting rooms with plastic chairs.  Almost all the receptionists were behind a barrier — some better designed than others.

The patient population is made up of mostly Alzheimers and Dementia sufferers.  All the residents are in a wheel chair, a portable bed or never moved from their beds.

Another surprise, the aides often use pulleys attached to patients to change their clothes, move them to the shower or simply change their diapers.  Depending on the home, these medical aides must change and clean about 19 patients each.  Some work in tandem others work solo — it all depends on the chore.

Further, most patients are only bathed twice a week, maximum three times a week.  During one of these showers their hair is washed.  Bottom line, it’s not how we envision our last days, weeks, months or years of life.

On the good side, the ‘better nursing homes’ have excellent care.  They hire a team of Geriatric Doctors that include Psychiatrists.  These Geriatric groups come to the Nursing Home through a PPO and the doctors physically visit once a month.  There is usually a Podiatrist group that also visits once a month (Medicare pays for podiatry services) and a dentist who comes once a quarter. The day to day care is with the Registered Nurses (RNs), Licensed Professional Nurses (LPNs), physical therapists and medical technicians.  They also have a contracted Hospice service.

Here are some tips when you need to look for a nursing home:

What is the turn-over rate of its employees

Needless to say, the less turnover the better the place.  If the staff is not leaving then something is going well — usually their paid above average wages

Is there a hair salon

If there is a hair salon then there’s a market for it.  This means the residents take pride in how they look.  People who take pride in themselves care about their environment.

Is it clean

As we all know, cleanliness is godliness

Is there a smell

Again, if it smells that means it’s really not clean – no matter how good it looks

Is there a smile on the faces of the staff

A smiling staff means a happy staff

Again, hopefully it doesn’t come to this but if it does, know how to choose the best one.